Currently reading:

The One Thing by Gary Keller


Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs by Abelson and Sussman


All time favourite books:

Siddhartha by Herman Hesse

Kamaswami, the merchant: “Yes indeed. And what is it now what you’ve got to give? What is it that you’ve learned, what you’re able to do?”
Siddhartha: “I can think. I can wait. I can fast.”
Kamaswami: “That’s everything?”
Siddhartha: “I believe, that’s everything!”
Kamaswami: “And what’s the use of that? For example, the fasting– what is it good for?”
Siddhartha: “It is very good, sir. When a person has nothing to eat, fasting is the smartest thing he could do. When, for example, Siddhartha hadn’t learned to fast, he would have to accept any kind of service before this day is up, whether it may be with you or wherever, because hunger would force him to do so. But like this, Siddhartha can wait calmly, he knows no impatience, he knows no emergency, for a long time he can allow hunger to besiege him and can laugh about it. This, sir, is what fasting is good for.”


The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck by Mark Manson

“Everything worthwhile in life is won through surmounting the associated negative experience. Any attempt to escape the negative, to avoid it or quash it or silence it, only backfires. The avoidance of suffering is a form of suffering. The avoidance of struggle is a struggle. The denial of failure is a failure. Hiding what is shameful is itself a form of shame.
Pain is an inextricable thread in the fabric of life, and to tear it out is not only impossible, but destructive: attempting to tear it out unravels everything else with it. To try to avoid pain is to give too many fucks about pain. In contrast, if you’re able to not give a fuck about the pain, you become unstoppable.”


The Art of War by Sun Tzu

“The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting.”

Deep Work by Cal Newport

“To remain valuable in our economy, therefore, you must master the art of quickly learning complicated things. This task requires deep work. If you don’t cultivate this ability, you’re likely to fall behind as technology advances.”


The Art of Learning by Josh Waitzkin

“If I want to be the best, I have to take risks others would avoid, always optimizing the learning potential of the moment and turning adversity to my advantage. That said, there are times when the body needs to heal, but those are ripe opportunities to deepen the mental, technical, internal side of my game. When aiming for the top, your path requires an engaged, searching mind. You have to make obstacles spur you to creative new angles in the learning process. Let setbacks deepen your resolve. You should always come off an injury or a loss better than when you went down.”

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